more where that came from

(original posts r by urs truly, a.j. bradley.)
kellyschirmann:

DEAR TUMBLR // I AM MOVING TO ARIZONA IN ONE WEEK. Please help me rid my studio of the millions of collages, chapbooks, tapes, original lettered artwork, vintage magazines & paper ephemera I have collected over the past couple years. You can PayPal $5-500 to kellyschirmann at gmail dot com & I will mail you an appropriately sized packet of rad original art, music, etc. THANK YOU BEAUTIFUL DUDE(TTE)S <3 <3

kellyschirmann:

DEAR TUMBLR // I AM MOVING TO ARIZONA IN ONE WEEK. Please help me rid my studio of the millions of collages, chapbooks, tapes, original lettered artwork, vintage magazines & paper ephemera I have collected over the past couple years. You can PayPal $5-500 to kellyschirmann at gmail dot com & I will mail you an appropriately sized packet of rad original art, music, etc. THANK YOU BEAUTIFUL DUDE(TTE)S <3 <3

explore-blog:

Fantastic New Yorker profile of Brian Eno. Also see his Oblique Strategies, Eno’s creativity prompts from the 1970s, mentioned in the first paragraph of the piece. 
It’s interesting to consider the parallels with science, where not-knowing is also the building block of “composition,” or progress. 

explore-blog:

Fantastic New Yorker profile of Brian Eno. Also see his Oblique Strategies, Eno’s creativity prompts from the 1970s, mentioned in the first paragraph of the piece. 

It’s interesting to consider the parallels with science, where not-knowing is also the building block of “composition,” or progress. 

(via delusyum)

wifilip:

New York, 1917. “Helen Campbell.” A Hunter College student licensed as a wireless operator during World War I. Bain News Service.

wifilip:

New York, 1917. “Helen Campbell.” A Hunter College student licensed as a wireless operator during World War I. Bain News Service.

(via classicland)

Goodnight Moon does two things right away: It sets up a world and then it subverts its own rules even as it follows them. It works like a sonata of sorts, but, like a good version of the form, it does not follow a wholly predictable structure. Many children’s books do, particularly for this age, as kids love repetition and the books supply it. They often end as we expect, with a circling back to the start, and a fun twist. This is satisfying but it can be forgettable. Kids — people — also love depth and surprise, and “Goodnight Moon” offers both. Here’s what I think it does that is so radical and illuminating for writers of all kinds, poets and fiction writers and more.

—In a wonderful essay from NYT’s Draft series, Aimee Bender considers what writers can learn from the beloved 1947 children’s book Goodnight Moon. Pair with what editors and mentors can learn from the great Ursula Nordstrom, the legendary children’s book editor responsible for Goodnight Moon as well as other children’s classics like Where the Wild Things Are, Charlotte’s Web, and The Giving Tree. (via explore-blog)

(via delusyum)